Creativity: a collaborative group effort or the result of a solitary struggle of individuals?

“We need great ideas!” – says the top management! That’s the simple goal of innovation often given as a guideline to the innovation manager of the company. The innovation manager then has the task to find good ways of stimulation idea creation. How can you do it? Read the following paragraphs to find out more!

Everybody knows (or assumes) that good ideas are based on creative work by a team mixed with well-educated professionals, and experienced staff from different disciplines. This could consist of the prolific sales guy, the “I’ve seen it all”-engineer and the strategic thinking business development manager. Every so often, it’s good to add someone who gives fresh input from out of the box. In German, there is the nice word “Querdenker” for such a person – a “cross thinker” who can take things into a different perspective. He or she adds new aspects, questions old rules which are taken as a premise, adds fresh ideas, and asks many “dumb questions” stirring the discussion and the creative process.

So let’s add all these guys together, put them into a room, add a few creativity methods and a discussion moderator. Let them brainstorm and discuss in the workshop – and out come many good ideas, right? You might even add some outsiders (customers, researchers, etc.) and call it “lead user workshop”. But how successful will this be to really create good ideas?

Let’s look at another perspective: Some people think that collaboration for creating new ideas is overstated. For instance, in an article in the New York Times, Susan Cain makes the point that “people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption.”  She cites a study by psychologists Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Gregory Feist and adds “the most spectacularly creative people in many fields are often introverted”. Isaac Newton and Steve Wozniak are presented as examples. Check out the article, a well written piece which combines the mentioned research results with historical evidence and a lot of common sense.

So does that mean brainstorming sessions and innovation workshops are useless? Should we all shut our doors, spend hours in confinement while seeking a genius solution to our current problem?

Practical experience from an industrial company

Let’s have a look at reality and practical application and some observations from my work as an innovation practitioner in the last few years: From my experience, the search for good new ideas should always start with a well-defined problem and a good innovation team to find and elaborate on ideas: see above!

In the literature and the lectures at university, the problems one might deal with are often colorful topics, which are fun to work on. Unfortunately, in a practical setting, the situation is often different and much less exciting. There is a current problem bothering the company, which is hard to tackle and a solution is urgently needed.  The question might be something very specific such as “How could a cleaning device be built to pre-clean parts before coating them?” with a long lists of technical conditions coming along. And yes, the competitors have found good solutions before you, there are a couple patents around blocking some approaches, there might a special technical competency missing in the team, and after all, you don’t have much money available for the required R&D activities. That’s all “very motivating” to begin with.

Anyway, the conventional way in many industrial companies to tackle this problem would be to assemble a team, give them a short advance note (such as a phone call or an email) and then get them together an innovation workshop. The team you have assembled has agreed to work on this for a day, and you send them some material to prepare themselves (the problem, some background, the customer requirements, what has been done in the past, etc.). Everybody gets together, but many didn’t have time to prepare themselves for the event. The discussion is structured and some creativity methods are used to support the process.  Fair enough! In addition to that, I would recommend to use these elements:

  • Present some basic insights on how your customers solve the problem now, and what the competitors offer.
  • Look at the basic principles of the problem (why do we need a clean part? How does cleaning work in general?) and question existing approaches to look at the broader picture (we might not have to clean, if there’s no dirt around in the first place).
  • Look at basic technical solution principles for the problem – no matter if it was applied in your industry sector yet.
  • Bring in some market and technology trends to “spice up” the discussion.
  • Create a positive atmosphere and assure a constructive discussion: Try to soothe participants who are discussing too aggressively and make sure everybody can contribute.

These elements do help to make the idea workshop productive – which means you can get a lot of ideas, of which some should be good – and new.

Individual creativity to support group creativity

Now, with what we have learned from the mentioned research from psychology, I would add the following recommendations:

Take the time to prepare the participants personally in one-on-one meetings on the objective of the workshop and about the problem that has to be addressed. Try to get them to work on the problem individually for at least a couple hours before everybody gets together.

Let’s face it: You can sure motivate people to look for “everything that makes our products better” in an idea workshop. But without good preparation of the participants, you’re going to get a lot of ideas missing the point. The people bringing in these ideas have a reason why they think their ideas are important, and should be given a thoughtful feedback (which should contribute to their motivation). But honestly, this needs some of your time and effort, which can be better spent. So do your homework and invest some time to prepare the workshop well and make sure participants will do the same.

Claus Lang-Koetz

Pipeline 2013 online Konferenz – Change the Game with Innovation That Works

Der persönliche Kontakt und der Aufbau persönlicher Netzwerke stellen oft einen wesentlicher Nutzen von Konferenzbesuchen dar. Oft sind diese daher mit langen Anreisen und erheblichen Kosten verbunden.

Eine Konferenz der besonderen Art ist daher die Pipeline 2013 online Konferenz für Innovative Produktentwicklung: diese kostenlose online Konferenz präsentiert Namhafte Keynote-Speakers, ermöglicht die Diskussion der Inhalte und den Zugang zu weitergehenden Informationen – und das alles von überall dort, wo ein entsprechender Internetzugang existiert. Wie gut auch persönliche Kontakte über diese Art der Konferenz geknüpft werden können muss jeder selbst entscheiden.  Zum Programm gibt es jedoch kaum etwas hinzuzufügen. Hier ein Auszug:

  • „Finding the Needle in the HaystackThomas Andrae, Director of 3M New Ventures EMEA
  • „The Click Moment: Seizing Opportunity in an Unpredictable WorldFrans Johansson, Innovation Author and Founder/CEO of the Medici Group
  • Maximizing Profits From Your New Product Portfolio – Bigger, Better, FewerDr. Robert G. Cooper, President, Product Development Institute and Professor Emeritus, McMaster University
  • „ON Innovation (Turning On Innovation in Your Culture, Teams and Organization)Terry Jones, Founder and Former CEO of Travelocity.com, and Chairman of Kayak.com
  • „The Art and Science of InnovationProf. Dr. Oliver Gassmann, Innovation Author and Director of the Institute for Technology Management of the University of St. Gallen

Weitere Informationen und kostenlose Registrierung:
Pipeline online Conference 2013

Sven Schimpf

Erfolgsschlüssel FuE

Was sind die Schlüssel zu einer erfolgreichen Forschung und Entwicklung? Und wie können die zugrundeliegenden Faktoren bewertet werden?

Dies war die Frage in einem internen Forschungsprojekt des Fraunhofer IAO. Die Ergebnisse der durchgeführten Studie, in der verschiedenste Unternehmen befragt wurden, wird in der Veranstaltung am 5. Juli 2011 vorgestellt. Ergänzt werden die Vorträge über das entwickelte Fraunhofer IAO FuE-Assessment durch Praxisbeiträge der Unternehmen Festo AG & Co. KG, Alfred Kärcher GmbH & Co.KG sowie der Wahl GmbH.

Ansprechpartner:
Judith Finger
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-2288 , Fax +49 711 970-2299
Judith.Finger@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:
Veranstaltung auf der Internetseite des Fraunhofer IAO

Sven Schimpf

ICPR 21: Innovation in Produkt und Produktion

Mit dem Thema „Innovation in Product and Production“ findet in Stuttgart vom 31.07-04.08.2011 die „21st International Conference on Production Research“  statt. Insbesondere in Themenbereichen „Production Research“ und „Industrial Engineering“ gilt die ICPR als eine der weltweit attraktivsten Veranstaltungen und bietet eine Plattform zum Austausch aktuellster Forschungsergebnisse aus Wissenschaft und Praxis. Bis zum 17. Dezember 2010 besteht die Möglichkeit Abstracts einzureichen.

Themenbereiche der Konferenz sind:

  • Industrial Engineering
  • Technology and Innovation Management
  • Production Technology, Systems and Management
  • Service Engineering
  • International Production
  • Environmental and Social Issues

Ergänzt wird das Programm durch den Besuch des Mercedes-Benz Museums sowie durch verschiedene (optionale) Aktivitäten am 04.08.2011.

Weitere Informationen:
http://www.icpr21.de

Sven Schimpf

Advanced Workshop „R&D Work Space 2015+“ – Designing Spatial Solutions for Future R&D

The R&D workspace is meant to have a considerable influence not only on the efficiency of R&D workers but also on the quality of their outcome, the internal and external communication and finally the attractiveness of companies for „high performers“.

The advanced workshop „R&D Work Space 2015+“ is organised in collaboration between the Fraunhofer IAO and the R&D Management Conference. Objectives of the advanced workshop are the following:

  • Understanding the R&D work space:
    Basic concepts of R&D work space design.
  • Learn from Good Practice Cases:
    Selected experiences from industry.
  • Explore new directions of work space design:
    Where to go next?

Based on the expertise of the Fraunhofer IAO, namely the Competence Center R&D Management and the Competence Center Workspace Innovation, the advanced workshop is organised interactively with industrial partners and researchers willing to bring this topic forward and to participate in the development and design of the „R&D Work Space 2015+“. The advanced workshop takes place on the Fraunhofer Campus in Stuttgart, Germany on the 12th and 13th of October.

A detailed programme will be available soon.

Contact:
Flavius Sturm
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-2040 , Fax +49 711 970-2299
Flavius.Sturm@iao.fraunhofer.de

Further Information:
Event Flyer
Fraunhofer IAO
R&D Management Conference Website

Sven Schimpf

Lean Development – Schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung

Schlanke und effiziente Prozesse sind in der Produktentwicklung heutzutage ein Pflichtprogramm. Leider lässt sich das Erfolgsrezept des Lean Development nicht 1:1 auf jedes Unternehmen übertragen. Individuelle Einflussfaktoren wie beispielsweise die Unternehmenskultur spielen eine wesentliche Rolle. Wie können Unternehmen ihre Entwicklung nach der Lean-Methode »schlank« gestalten? Welche strategischen Ansätze eignen sich im Lean Development und wie wirken sich diese aus?

Das Fraunhofer IAO möchte Fragen im Rahmen des Seminars »Lean Development – schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung« am Donnerstag, 30. September 2010 im Institutszentrum Stuttgart der Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft mit praktisch nutzbaren Konzepten, Maßnahmen und Methoden beantworten sowie deren Umsetzung anhand von Praxisbeispielen vorstellen.

Ansprechpartner:
Michael Schubert
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-2046 , Fax +49 711 970-2299
Michael.Schubert@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:
Veranstaltung auf der Internetseite des Fraunhofer IAO

Sven Schimpf

Lean Development – Schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung – 2. Termin

Aufgrund der großen Nachfrage wird für die Veranstaltung „Lean Development – Schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung“ ein zweiter Termin am  28. April 2010 angeboten.

Ansprechpartner:
Michael Schubert
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-2046, Fax +49 711 970-2299
Michael.Schubert@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:
Veranstaltung auf der Internetseite des Fraunhofer IAO

Sven Schimpf

R&D Management Konferenz 2010 in Manchester

Die R&D Management Konferenz 2010 findet vom 30. Juni bis zum 2. Juli in Manchester, UK an der Manchester Business School statt. Das Thema der Konferenz lautet „Information, imagination and intelligence in R&D Management„. Wie auch in den letzten Jahren kann man sicherlich wieder mit spannenden Beiträgen aus Industrie und Forschung rechnen.

Weitere Informationen:
Webseite der R&D Management Konferenz
Call for Papers/Presentations

Sven Schimpf

Lean Development – Schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung

Schlanke und effiziente Prozesse sind in der Produktentwicklung heutzutage ein Pflichtprogramm. Leider lässt sich das Erfolgsrezept des Lean Development nicht 1:1 auf jedes Unternehmen übertragen. Individuelle Einflussfaktoren wie beispielsweise die Unternehmenskultur spielen eine wesentliche Rolle. Wie können Unternehmen ihre Entwicklung nach der Lean-Methode »schlank« gestalten? Welche strategischen Ansätze eignen sich im Lean Development und wie wirken sich diese aus?

Das Fraunhofer IAO möchte Fragen im Rahmen des Seminars »Lean Development – schlanke und effiziente Produktentwicklung« am Donnerstag, 28. Januar 2010 im Institutszentrum Stuttgart der Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft mit praktisch nutzbaren Konzepten, Maßnahmen und Methoden beantworten sowie deren Umsetzung vorstellen.

Ansprechpartner:
Michael Schubert
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-2046, Fax +49 711 970-2299
Michael.Schubert@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:
Veranstaltung auf der Internetseite des Fraunhofer IAO

Sven Schimpf

Low Cost Innovation

Kann der Innovationserfolg gesteigert werden, obwohl Entwicklungskosten gespart werden müssen und die Marktpreise kontinuierlich fallen?
Mit dieser Thematik beschäftigt sich das Seminar des Fraunhofer IAO am Mittwoch 25. November 2009. Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es, Einblick in die Praxis von Unternehmen zu geben, die sich durch derartige Innovationen hervorgetan haben. Dabei stehen Fragestellungen rund um die Gestaltung individueller Low Cost-Strategien, von der Entwicklung günstiger Produkte bis hin zur Kostenoptimierung von Innovationsprozessen im Mittelpunkt.

Informationen zu Programm und Anmeldung sind im Internet auf der Webseite des Fraunhofer IAO zu finden.

Ansprechpartner:
Liza Wohlfart
Nobelstraße 12, 70569 Stuttgart
Telefon +49 711 970-5310, Fax +49 711 970-2299
Liza.Wohlfart@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:
Programmflyer zum Download
Online-Anmeldeseite

Sven Schimpf